Above is a pic of Lt. Colonel James Galbraith, Regimental Colour in hand, alongside Bobbie the regimental dog and some of the other "Last Eleven" survivors of the 66th (Berkshire) Regiment, making their last stand in one of the walled gardens just South of Khig village, a few miles West of the Afghan town of Maiwand.

Saturday, April 4, 2015

Lending a hand to Larry Brom...

It's been a rough year for the Historical Wargaming hobby, which has lost several "Grand Old Men", most recently the legendary Pat Condray, long-time champion of the wonders of gaming both the War of Spanish Succession and the Spanish Civil War.  Today I, and probably at least a few readers of this blog, learned that Larry Brom -- author of "The Sword And The Flame" set of colonial wargame rules, first published in 1979, and the force to be reckoned with in colonial miniature wargaming here in the USA ever since then -- is in need of assistance in order to pay for additional medical care and physical therapy to help in recovering from a pair of injuries he suffered this past Summer and Fall.



Ever since reading TSATF as a 14 year-old boy back in 1979, I've felt like I owed Larry Brom.  I loved and continue to love those rules so much, and over the years they have allowed me to enjoy so many games with so many other players in so many places across this country, playing with everyone from fellow colonial history-aficionados to little kids who didn't know the difference between a Martini-Henry and a Jezail -- when we started that is, by the time we finished they knew well, believe me! (And needless to say, they had also had a lot of fun!)

Larry has written rules sets for a wide variety of eras and theaters of war, mostly covering the 19th and 20th Centuries.  Before taking up the hobby, he served as a combat Marine in the Korean War.



One of the high points of my many years in the hobby was finally meeting Larry in person for the first time at the first ever all-TSATF "Colonial Barracks" convention in Metarie, Louisiana, right outside New Orleans, where I was able to present him with a miniature porcelain Maiwand Lion souvenir statue from Forbury Gardens in Reading, to commemorate bringing my "Maiwand Day" TSATF game all the way from Los Angeles to Louisiana to attend the con -- largely in order to meet him!


I made a donation to the fund, which was set up by Larry's two adult daughters, Lori and Christy Brom, pictured alongside him above.  I would ask humbly anyone visiting this blog, if they are in a position to do so responsibly, without putting themselves in any financial distress, to consider donating as well.  The donation can be very small, as I don't think there is a minimum dollar amount.  I'm just glad I'm in a position where I was able to help out a little bit.

Thanks for taking the time to read this, and here's a link directly to the fundraising campaign to help Larry with his ongoing healthcare expenses:

GoFundMe campaign for Larry Brom


Sunday, March 29, 2015

BACK TO THE FUTURE (a hint of things to come...)

Greetings to all my fellow travellers in the Miniature Wargaming Blogosphere...

I'm calling this post "BACK TO THE FUTURE" because it involves the near-future completion of a big project, which said project is set in the past, so it seemed like an appropriate title!

Well, it's been a long time coming.  I've been whittling away at this stick of mine called "Terrain for the Battle of Charasiab" for... well, a long time.  I think I officially decided to build it soon after my family moved houses and one of my closest military history & gaming friends visited Los Angeles and I moved my old wargame ping-pong table (which was in the garage at my old house) into my home-office and set the terrain for the Charasiab scenario up and got to play something like one turn before the friend of mine had to leave.  Arghhhh!  A painful memory even lo these 3 years later.   Yikes -- three years!  That's kind of crazy.  Maiwand took me a little over three months to build, and that was all from scratch, using no pre-existing terrain pieces.  The terrain was big but it was all very simple, involving not one single hill or mountain.  Plus I had a lot of help from gamer friends and from all three of my then much younger children.  But I built my Maiwand terrain five years ago, and as every parent knows, five years makes a lifetime of difference in terms of childhood activities.  From time to time the kids have helped me out on pieces of the Charasiab terrain, which I'm thankful for, but they are far, far busier with their own school-work and extracurricular activities -- sports, art, debate, "mock trial", etc. -- than they were back then.  My son will be leaving for college in August, my older daughter is almost done with her Freshman year of high school.  They are both teenagers, and my son has gone from a boy to a young man.  Apologies, as none of this has anything to do with the Charasiab terrain, but somehow looking back on these past three years during which I've been working on it, I can't help but reflect on other things as well.  My amazing wife remains supportive of my hobby activities.  There are qualifiers to that support when she wants something done and I'm busy trying to recreate c.1880 Afghanistan, but I'm the first to admit (here, though perhaps not always directly to her at those times!) that at most of those particular moments she is not being at all unreasonable.  I kind of work like a maniac at my career, and she believes that my hobby helps me maintain my sanity, and ability to keep plugging away in the face of occassional professional adversities, and in this I think she is a very wise woman, as well as a very beautiful, charming, and intelligent one.  Anyway, on to the -- very happy -- matter at hand...

Today took me by surprise.  I wasn't at all planning for what happened, which is that today I could finally see the light at the end of the Charasiab tunnel.  It may be weird to refer to a project I chose to build for myself as a "tunnel", but I'm sure at least some of those reading this can relate to my use of the term.  It doesn't mean I haven't been enjoying my time in this tunnel, or that I would want to somehow "escape" from it, it just means... it's been a long road, and I am excited at the thought that I may finally be getting close to seeing the finished product of all this time and effort come to life on the table, where I'll at last be able to share in its enjoyment with my friends and fellow wargamers.

Nothing is finished yet, but today I painted the bottom of the Talab Khairabad -- the Khairabad Marsh or Swamp, and I think it turned out pretty well.  I also received an email from Chris The Model Maker containing pics of the as yet unpainted three villages which will serve as the villages of Charasiab, Khairabad, and Hindiki (aka: Hinduki or Indiki).  As to be expected, these look amazing.  The larger village which will serve as the Northern edge of Charasiab includes two water-mills, and the two smaller villages include one water-mill apiece.  The three villages can also be combined together to seamlessly form a larger village containing four watermills.  The name "Charasiab" is generally understood to mean "Four Watermills," so I'll be able to combine the villages  if I ever want to adjust the battle and have the British occupy Charasiab and be attacked by the Afghans, or even if I just want to take some pics showing the Kabul Field Force advancing through it en route to their starting positions, for a historical narrative of the battle.

At the same time as these happy developments, I realized this blog reached 75,000 hits, was visited by a computer user in 120th different country, and signed up its 130th follower.  I'm very grateful to everyone who visits from each and every corner of the globe.  If not for you, maintaining this blog would be a very lonely experience, and one which I would have given up long ago, so THANK YOU again!

I'm not going to post a ton of WIP pics of building and painting the swamp, or of all the many experiments I've been doing in preparation for tinting and pouring the resin I'll be using to fill in the three river boards and the swamp board.  Trust me, those posts with their standard complement of several hundred pics will come in time!  Right now I just want to post a handful of pics to give you a glimpse of what -- hopefully -- is to come here at "Maiwand Day," over the next few months.  I hope you enjoy them...





The swamp basin below will be largely be filled with green
reeds/swamp grass like that seem in the river test piece above...




Two board missing on the left or Western edge of the table, but here's the middle and right end...


This is NOT an Afghan building, but it fit so well with the swamp I had to take a pic...


Saved the best for last: here's a few of the WIP pics from Chris The Model Maker
(built but still unpainted), NOTE: canal pieces are separate & movable...






4/1/2015 - ADDING A COUPLE MORE PICS...

Spurred on by the progress shown above, I cleared off the desk in my office, moved it adjacent to the ping-pong/wargame table, set up the full 6'x12' Charasiab lay-out, and took a couple of Panorama shots:



A few things will change from these pics to the finished version:

(1)  the three small Mexican villages will be replaced with new Afghan versions;
(2)  I'll finish the road system so it's made entirely of latex caulk road sections, custom-made to fit this layout;
(3)  I'll make more latex caulk crop-fields, including some poppy fields with red "course flock";
(4)  finish adding green reeds/swamp grass to the Logar River and Khairabad Marsh;
(5)  a big one: finally pour resin into the three river boards and one swamp board;

...and last but possibly not least:

(6)  maybe convince myself to build a 6" deep x 30" long x 18" high mountain piece to fit between the East bank of the Logar River and the East table edge.  The question with this one is being unsure how much it might interfere with moving figures around near that end of the table.  For now it's still a possibility.



Saturday, February 28, 2015

A RIVER TOO FAR

As is obvious to anyone who's recently visited this blog, my hobby time lately has been "All About the Rivers," so to speak, as I've been enmeshed since this past Spring in building a set of terrain boards to represent the Logar and Kabul Rivers for a refight of the Second Afghan War battle of Charasiab fought in October 1879.

A few months ago my gaming friend JG Randall asked if I could help him with the terrain layout for a big game he was planning.  It would be a massive refight of the British Airborne attack on Arnhem in September 1944.  I've had a life-long interest in Airborne operations in general and the Battle of Arnhem in particular ever since seeing "A Brige Too Far" as a 10 year-old boy back in 1975.  Since I'd spent the past months "immersed" in model river building (lame aquatic pun intended!), I volunteered to build the river itself.  JG and his terrain-meister partner-in-wargaming-crime Frank Pattersen had already got a jump on building the bridge itself so I knew dimensions required.  The Arnhem table would be 6' wide and the bridge was 14" wide, so I decided on a 6'x1' river.  Since I had a handy piece of 2'x6' dual-tempered Masonite in my garage, it seemed the perfect size.  The board I had was 3/16" thick.  If I was starting from scratch I would have used a 1/8" thick board, but the difference was so slight I didn't hesitate to use what was on hand.  I also decided to cut the 6' length into three equal sized 2' long pieces that would fit together end-to-end.



After cutting the boards the next step was painting them.   First I "primed" the river pieces with a vibrant mix of blue and green colors, so when I went over them with the final more drably toned-down olive river green, there would be just a hint of darker, more lush color lying below the surface to provide a bit more "depth"...








After the bright colors dried I did the second coat using a mixture of YELLOW-OCHRE and BLACK, which I have come to find is an excellent formula for creating drab olive green from Artist's Acrylics...








Once I was happy with the olive green river water color, I added "water" texture using a layer of EXTRA HEAVY GEL GLOSS (this is an acrylic product that is water-soluble)...


I painted this on with an inexpensive 1" brush.  I had already experimented a bit with the application process and here used a generous amount of the Gloss Gel and made an effort to apply it in a "wave" pattern.  I also tried to make the "waves" carry over from board to board so they'd fit together as seamlessly as possible...





I was very happy with the results, and felt like it had not taken much effort compared with how well it turned out.

..







I was so impressed enough with the look of the newly-minted river that I spent some time setting up some figures to show it off.  First a handful of my Second Afghan War Brits (72nd Highlanders to be specific)...


...and some pieces of ROCKY TERRAIN laid out along the riverbank or coast...


...then some "Darkest Africa" Explorer types on the bank of a major river...





Finally I dug out and dusted off some of my long-untouched French-&-Indian War figures, including some rowboats and Canoes, and laid them out -- first in a mid-18th Century Caribbean setting...



...and then in a no-holds-barred Wolfe vs. Montcalm-esque -- albeit at the skirmish level -- classic F&IW set-up, complete with pine forest...

(The only thing I needed to do to make these pics look a lot better would be refinish the rather lame blue bases of the boats to match the surface of these river boards, which would be quite easy to do, but which I have not yet and probably never will get around to.)













After sending these pics to a buddy of mine who is a huge F&IW aficionado I put the figures and canoes back in their boxes and drove down to Orange County to deliver the river to JG with some time to spare before the big game.

When game day arrived I was luckily able to get away from home and away from work and -- for a change -- get a chance to actually PLAY A MINIATURE WARGAME -- which was a lot of fun!

The game itself was a full-scale play-test in advance of the same scenario being run at an upcoming "Game Day" event for the club JG and Frank belong to down in Anaheim.

A bunch of guys were there to play, including my friend Matthew who accompanied my son and I to the first ever Colonial Barracks convention in New Orleans back in 2011.  Matthew, myself, and Mark Deliduka played the British Paras and Glider forces under the overall command of Harmon Ward as General Urquart.  Frank (the prolific terrain-builder) and Howard -- a tall, young Asian-American college student -- played the Germans.

I commanded one Parachute Brigade.  The British forces included a second Para Brigade and one Brigade of Glider-borne troops.  The landing itself was a bit of a chaotic mess, kind of like a scaled down version of the real thing, only much less violent and exhausting.

In the first few turns after landing I lost the lion's share of one of my three battalions counterattacking a German unit ensconced in a section of woods -- tragically it was the battalion commanded by Colonel John Frost!

The "middle" of the game was extremely hard going for my command, but while my two fellow British commanders suffered heavy casualties as they remained in place to defend our landing zone for the sake of the reinforcement wave of gliders and paras, I somehow managed by the skin of my teeth to break through the German forces and clear a path for my two surviving, disconnected battalions to both make it off the 18' long "Landing Table" and onto the "Arnhem Table"!

... but by that time we'd been playing for about 8 hours, so needless to say, we never got to grips on the streets of Arnhem, let alone atop the bridge over the river I had built.  Still, it was great to actually "play" a game for a change -- and I felt like I'd aquitted myself very well by managing to reach Arnhem with 2/3rds of my force relatively intact despite facing serious opposition all along the way.

Here's a bunch of pics I took during the play-test game:

NOTE: In addition to painting and basing all the troops and preparing most of the terrain, JG was also responsible for building ALL of the Airborne paraphenalia himself -- the transport planes, the gliders, the parachutes and equipment containers as well.  He is a bit of a one-man machine -- but he has a secret weapon, which is his close friend Frank, who is quite famous down in the Orange County wargaming community for being a human terrain-building-factory as well as a prolific and talented figure-painter.  The rules we used also came courtesy of JG.  They're called "FIRE & MANEUVER" and elegantly incorporate a lot of logistical elements without slowing or bogging down game-play at all.  He wrote them a few years ago and they're very popular at his club, where several gamers have been trying to convince him to make them available to the public.



































Here's a couple of very brief VIDEOS showing the transports and parachutes in action...

VIDEO #1:

video

VIDEO #2 (this one's a little bit better!)

video



























































Tennis Courts used in the actual battle to hold German POWs, here used by the Germans to hold some British Airborne POWs...



...but not for long!













The Hartenstein Hotel...









British Glider troops dug in to defend the Landing Zones in preparation for the second wave of British reinforcements...


Meanwhile on the road to Arnhem...



















A particularly good shooting roll by the Paras -- I think I needed fours or better to hit...




A German unit in retreat...








My first unit to reach the end of the "Landing Table" and cross over -- still somewhat intact -- onto the "Arnhem Table"...


Meanwhile, back at the Landing Zone(s), the Glider forces remained dug-in defending half of the area they were ordered to hold, awaiting the second wave of German assault...




Unfortunately the other half of the Landing Zone area had been taken in hard fighting by German Naval Infantry forces, who now occupied the defensive positions estalished earlier by the British Glider troops...


Still, I was happy to be able to reach and occupy Arnhem Bridge...






...though the hour was so late that no actual fighting was to occur across it or at either end.

The game was a lot of fun, the only down-side being that the 6'x1' river I'd built NEVER CAME INTO PLAY!  Fighting across the length of the "Landing Table" was an epic endeavor in itself that took us at least 6 hrs. playing time, possibly a bit more.  If we'd started early in the day, at 9:00 or 10:00am, we could have been able to play the whole thing from start to finish by Midnight -- but we also needed to clean up after we were done, since everything had to be taken off the premises, so that wouldn't have worked very well either.  despite being a lover of epic size scenarios and epic size games, I think the answer may be to split this one up into two seperate component games, the first playing the landing portion, while the second plays the street fighting in Arnhem itself.  That or else condense the Landing portion of the scenario down significantly, which could also work well.

Another possibility is to start with the British Paras already ensconced in Arnhem and use the epic sized 18' "Landing" table to play XXX Corps fighting its way down the road to reach the bridge and relieve the Paras.  That might be the most thrillingly dramatic and suspensful version.  JG is a consumate Game Master and I'm sure he has been digesting the results of the play-test and figuring out how best to incorporate the lessons it taught.

For anyone interested in learning more about JG's rules, called "FIRE & MANEUVER", here's a LINK to the "Primer" which provides the essentials of the rules: