Above is a pic of Lt. Colonel James Galbraith, Regimental Colour in hand, alongside Bobbie the regimental dog and some of the other "Last Eleven" survivors of the 66th (Berkshire) Regiment, making their last stand in one of the walled gardens just South of Khig village, a few miles West of the Afghan town of Maiwand.

Sunday, January 22, 2012

Maiwand Saturday @ COLONIAL BARRACKS (2 of 7)

THESE 50 PICS SHOW:

Major John Ready marches his Baggage Guard, consisting of a combined unit of British and Indian Infantry made up of troops from all three Infantry battalions, and unit of Indian cavalry, East, towards the village of Khig...

Afghans move their Tribal Cavalry onto the table...

3rd Scinde Horse use the Western-most nullah to advance North towards the approaching Afghan army under cover...

Afghan Regular Cavalry moves onto the table...

The rest of the RHA battery comes online behind that of Lt. Hector Maclaine, whose own gun already "dropped trail" and is in firing position (Maclaine got the battle rolling by galloping his section of guns North and opening fire on the passing Afghan army, not knowing quite how big it was at the time)...

Afghan regular infantry move onto the table...

66th Regt. advance in the center nullah...

Jacob's Rifles advance on the center of the Maiwand plain, just to the left of the 66th...

1st Bombay Grenadiers advance in the Western nullah, covering the British left flank...

Half-size unit of elite Bombay Sappers & Miners take farthest-most position in the center nullah, just ahead and to the North of the 66th Regt...

3rd Bombay Light Cavalry follow 3rd Scinde Horse into the Western nullah, advancing North behind them...

66th Regt. moves out of the center nullah Eastwards, forms 2-rank open order firing line covering the center of the plain...

Jacob's Rifles take up the 66th Regt.'s position in the center nullah, forming a long single-rank firing line, with Half-size unit of elite Bombay Sappers & Miners to their left...

3rd Scinde Horse advance out of the North end of the Western nullah and CHARGE the Tribal Infantry to their front...

NOTE:

DUST-COLORED SMOKE is used to mark units that have MOVED.

WHITE SMOKE is used to mark units that have FIRED.















































2 comments:

  1. Absolutely tremendous; thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You're very welcome, Michael -- and thank you for taking the time and effort to leave a comment!

    ReplyDelete